Published: Wednesday 09 May 2018

Nosebleeds are a fairly common childhood ailment, usually caused by dry or weakened blood vessels in the delicate interior of the nose. These vessels can rupture if the nose is knocked or if a little finger has a pick of it, or even through a sneeze!

Most nosebleeds that need proper medical attention occur in adults but it can be worrying when children have them. However, you should see the GP if a child under the age of two has a nosebleed.

How can you help a child with a nosebleed?

  • Make the child sit down, with their head tipped forward
  • Hold or pinch the nose, just above the nostrils on the soft part of the nose. Keep doing this for about 10 minutes.
  • Checking every 10 minutes to see if the bleeding has stopped
  • Give them something (preferably dark coloured) for the blood to drip onto such as a towel
  • Ensure that the child breathes through their mouth
  • If you have an ice pack (or frozen peas, wrapped in a tea towel!) to hand, you can place that at the top of the nose
  • If the bleeding carries on for more than 30 minutes, take the child to A&E, ensuring they stay sat up as much as possible.

Once the nosebleed has stopped, try to make sure that the child does not blow their nose or pick it. They should also give hot drinks a miss too. If nosebleeds start to occur on a regular basis, the child should see a doctor.

If you’re a childcare professional working in an Early Years setting, make sure your Paediatric First Aid skills are up-to-date with our excellent course. Similarly, if you're a parent of a young family, spend time with us learning essential first aid skills so you can react in an emergency. We have a team of expert tutors who lead our courses, ensuring that they’re current, informative and engaging.

Photo credit: By User: Ragesoss - Crop of File: Young child with nosebleed, smiling.jpeg, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=50982273


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